Where Can I Find a Ski Job?

A chairlift in France

Welcome to part 4 of a guide to working a ski season.

It is possible, of course, to go to the resort and find yourself a job. To do this, you may need to rely on having money to back you up, and a lot of luck. If you do such a thing, you may be able to find jobs last minute and negotiate the terms of your contract. However, an easier, more certain way to work a ski season is to find a job in advance. The following three resources list jobs from many different companies, in all locations around the world.

Natives. Natives are one of the most active websites in terms of posting ski jobs around the world. I would single them out as the best resource that stand head and shoulders above the others. They offer information about job fairs, upcoming jobs, and immediate positions available. Head here first to look for everything that you need in one tidy place.

Ski Jobs. Another site that offers searchable job listing all over the world.

Season Workers. Although not limited to ski jobs, season workers lists a large variety of ski jobs all around the world.

Within Europe, you normally apply to a company and they place you at a position within one of their resorts. In North America, you may have to apply to the resort as they hire all their own staff. To do this, find the website of the resort that you would like to work in and look at the jobs page Due to the large number of resorts, I will not list them here (although I recommend visiting Whistler Blackcomb).

That’s almost it.

One more piece of advice; get travel insurance that covers you for a season of skiing and carte neige. Despite breaking my back on the mountain, I am non the worse for it because I had financial protection. Hopefully your employers can help you with insurance and carte neige is available from the ski pass office for under £40; it offers emergency pick-up from anywhere on the mountain when injured (my ‘rescue’ from the piste would have cost me a not so cool £500 without it).

Now that’s it.

Happy snow days.

This is the end of part 4 of a guide to working a ski season. You can also read:

Part 1. What are the Typical Benefits and Drawbacks of Working a Ski Season?

Part 2. Which Job Should I have in a Ski Resort?

Part 3. Where and When Should I Do a Ski Season?

If you feel that this or any of the posts are missing something and could be improved, please send me a message to let me know so that I can improve it. You can also subscribe for free updates to keep in-the-know with future travel advice and stories.

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